Kicks Condor

LEECHING AND LINKING IN THE HYPERTEXT KINGDOM

I FIRST DISCOVERED
THE 【TECHS-MECHS】WHO
ARE A CLAN OF SOUTH
OF THE BORDER GUNDAM
BREAKING DOWN
IMMIGRATION FENCES
WITH THEIR
IMPRESSIVE MANOS
MECANICAS

PLUNDER THE ARCHIVES

This page is also on dat.

MOVING ALONG LET'S SEE MY FAVORITE PLACES I NO LONGER LINK TO ANYTHING THATS VERY FAMOUS

philosopher.life, the 'wiki'/'avatar'/'life' of h0p3. serious rabbithole.

ramblinggit, bumped into him, lots of crossover with this blog.

ᛝ ᛝ ᛝ — lucid.

whimsy.space v good zine by danielx.

caesar naples wiki social media website.

indieweb: .xyz, eli, c.rwr, boffosocko.

nostalgia: geocities.institute, bad cmd.

true hackers: ccc.de, fffff.at, voja antonić, cnlohr, esoteric.codes.

chips: zeptobars, scargill, 41j.

dwm, julia, tridactyl these are things you'll want on linux.

neil c very famous but should be a world icon.

the world or cate le bon you pick.

sammyclassicsonicfan the original teen rage adventure.

innovation.isotropic.org probly the best carl chudyk game.

and opinionated gamers for non-chudyk game analysis.

my twitter. my github. minor things.

#garage

(SURE, QUEUE THE WEEZER SONG)

This is one of my primary tags. Mainly quotes from novels, links to music and zines, D.I.Y. stuff, hacking, junk you’d do in a garage. (However, keep in mind that many of my actual letters written to other blogs are in the hypertext tag—which is my primary tag.)

05 Oct 2018

‘One day my window was darkened by the form of a young hunter. The man was wearing leather and carrying a rifle. After looking at me for a moment, he came to my door and opened it without knocking. He stood in the shadow of the door and stared at me. His eyes were milky blue and his reddish beard hardly concealed his skin. I immediately took him for a half-wit and was terrified. He did nothing: after gazing at what was in the room, he shut the door behind him and went way.’ — from “The House Plans” by Lydia Davis, p53 in The Collected Stories

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25 Sep 2018

‘After walking through a few other rooms, thinking about The Rose, I returned to look at the painting again. I read the placard again, though I had read it less than an hour before. Everything that is is a record of its process, I thought; this description of The Rose in front of me had more to do with where it had been composed and when than with what The Rose itself was struggling to be. Had the curator lacked imagination, or was it our language that lacked imagination? I looked again at the radiating folds of paint, like rock chipped away by the wind and the rain. Each one recorded the time that had passed while DeFeo worked on The Rose. All the placards around me were lists: a title, an artist, a place, and a time. The best the curator could do was log the facts. Facts are a set of coordinates, in space and in time. Causation, motivation, character—all the rest is fiction.’ — p134, Madeleine E by Gabriel Blackwell

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21 Sep 2018

Sort Trek

Sweet ‘foone’ hack to re-sort Trek episodes based on the subs.

Foone’s got a great thing going on Twitter. I can’t quite complain as much about the place when it’s used to this effect.

The script is called ‘SplitBySubs’ and it gives you clips at all the timestamps where subtitles start and stop. And then you do things like… this!

So I generated the Silence Video. It’s 16 minutes long and it’ll get me copyright-striked on youtube, but here’s the first 2 minutes of it, basically everything up to the Intro. pic.twitter.com/mMVuaGCbFH — foone (@Foone) September 21, 2018

Best of all, the script is now out there. Algorithms are well-suited to mischief. Gah, I was going to read this weekend…

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‘Logic, [Nicholas] suggests, knowing, is like an n-sided polygon nested inside a circle. The more sides you add, the more complexities you introduce, the more the polygon approaches the circle which surrounds it. And yet, the farther away it gets as well. For the circle is but a single, seamless line, whereas your polygon seems to be breeding more and more lines, more and more angles, becoming less and less seamless.’ — Seeing is Forgetting the Name of the Thing One Sees by Lawrence Weschler

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14 Sep 2018

‘He was a pekingese, and as such he had a peculiar, droll manner of walking that aroused my sympathy no less than his facial expression, which was a constant meld of almost tearful sorrow and unreasonable, condescending arrogance.’ — p501, The Island of Second Sight by Vigoleis

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‘I had a memory of reacting similarly to my own mother’s breakups, to cutting off my emotions for the men I had once loved or for whom I’d at least felt an affection. Once I failed at such an attempt; I sobbed and mouthed the name of my mother’s ex while a new man slept in her bed. I sobbed similarly on subsequent nights until I had finally rid myself of any lingering affections.’ — p195, Person/a by Elizabeth Ellen

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Danielx on Whimsy.Space

Ok, trying out an interview here—throwing some questions to the author of a beloved ‘zine’/‘operating system’.

I try to go out looking for links as much as possible.

(God’s sake, man—why?? Who needs more links, I can give you links—don’t toss yourself into the brambles—)

But I love to see the horrors and grotesques—to measure and inspect them. I aspire to be a grotesque and must be very studious about achieving it!

It all pays off when a link like whimsy.space comes a long.

kicks: Daniel, had a few questions about whimsy.space. (I really love glitch, too, of course—and hope it’s doing well, but the zine hits a nerve for me.) So, what ‘works’/‘zines’ inspired whimsy.space?

danielx: I was inspired by sites that have a lot of heart, things like the original Geocities. Also the feeling of personal computing from the mid 90s like win 3.1 and Win95. I’m also a fan of things like Dwarf Fortress and Bennett Foddy’s games.

Not necessarily that they are inaccessible for the sake of being inaccessible, but that if they were simpler they would be something different. Philosophically I’ve read and respect Alan Kay “The real computer revolution hasn’t happened yet” and Bret Victor.

kicks: Yeah, oh man, Foddy. I teach at an elementary school and a favorite activity I do is to play Foddy games with the kids hooked up to wires (Makey Makey-style) so that when they close the loop (by jumping on the floor or slapping hands, for instance) then CLOP hops around. It’s a credit to the simplicity of his design that we can do that.

What do you hope for it now? Was it just a momentary plaything—or is it an obsession?

danielx: It has been an on and off obsession. It depends on what else I’ve got going on in life and work outside of my own esoteric pursuits.

It’s definitely the hobby that brings me the most joy when I get to dig into it and see where it goes. Early on I decided that it would be for my own personal enjoyment and I wouldn’t look for ways to “make it a success” or “turn it into a business”. I want to keep my work and play separate you could say 😃

kicks: I like that it doesn’t explain itself. I didn’t even get that it was REALLY a zine the first time I visited. I still don’t really understand how the filesystem and social media inside of it works. And I can’t help but feel that its opacity is symbolic. It feels like a hidden trove - like a person is or maybe like an animal is. You probably don’t care about ease of use - how did you design it?

danielx: I’ve created a lot of different web applications and sites and things over the years. Some of them for fun and some as businesses. With whimsy.space my goal was to have it be a curated collection of all my works along with other things I find interesting. About eight years ago I built an online game development environment at pixieengine.com. Now it’s been simplified to a pixel editor and art community. Whimsy.space is the spiritual successor to that, I want many different applications that can interact and contribute to creating content. To recreate the part of personal computing where the operator of the computer could combine small components in interesting ways to get profound results.

I care some about ease of use, though it’s not been my top priority lately. Similar to Bennett Foddy’s games I want it to be as easy as it can be without losing its essence and becoming something else.

The design and implementation is a lot of custom code and some integrations of existing components. The site itself is serverless/static hosted on AWS with S3 and CloudFront. I use AWS Cognito for the My Briefcase authentication feature and each user can upload to their own S3 subfolder. The UI is all my custom js/css inspired by Win3.1/95. The code editor is Ace. The apps run in iframes and talk to the system over postMessage. I use CoffeeScript for most of the code.

The essence of the zine part came from my tendency to always go too deep on architecture and infrastructure, so by having a periodic release of content it would force me to prioritize only the features that aided the content and not be a system of pure mechanics with nothing to showcase it.

kicks: Jeepers, didn’t expect that. Is this a kind of backend that you would recommend to hobbyists? I’m used to static HTML and JS.

danielx: I wouldn’t recommend going deep into AWS or other Cloud services for hobbyists. Since I do software engineering for my employment I’ve gained a lot of experience on “industrial strength” solutions.

The challenge is finding the subset that actually solve more problems than they cause.

I often feel like I’m crawling around in Jeff Bezos’ spaceship trying to bring alien technology to the people.

kicks: Are handmade ‘blogs’/‘zines’/‘home pages’ dying? Would that be a bad thing - like: is there something else?

danielx: They’re dying in the sense that every living thing is in a constant cycle of death and rebirth. There are probably more handmade blogs and home pages today than ever before (in an absolute sense) but proportionally they make up a smaller part of the internet.

I would like to see more people sharing personal computing and smaller internet communities. Businesses exist to consume consumers, by getting our hands dirty and crafting using technology individuals can gain knowledge and understanding of how these systems work so we might not be so vulnerable to all these forces trying to devour us. The web is a modern marvel, not quite as complex as nature, but it has its own evolution and ecology. I enjoy the first hand experience of digging around in it to see what I can learn about systems as well as myself.

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10 Sep 2018

Tim Toady

Phonetic refactoring of the acronym TMTOWDI. Or, there’s more than one way to do it.

Phonetic refactoring of the acronym TMTOWDI. Or, there’s more than one way to do it.

This is a contentious term; I think it is useful to combat dogmatism. It’s worth exploring other routes even if they turn up as culs-de-sac. I have lived in many culs-de-sac and I think they have some benefits. Extra parking, for instance.

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tultywits

talk of and use the little things you want to survive.

talk of and use the little things you want to survive.

This page, for instance, uses HTML definition lists. (The <dl>, <dt> and <dd> tags.) These are quite obscure tags compared to the heavily dominant <div> and <p> tags. I use them because someone has put work into them and I guess I want them to survive. They are a ‘tultywit’. The acronym doesn’t quite stand up under that usage; I assure you, the meaning does.

Some of my current tultywits: Beaker Browser, the Indieweb and Blogging of a personal, misdirected, colorful kind.

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ridtyawtr

reality is darker than you are willing to recognize, but it could be brighter than what you can imagine.

reality is darker than you are willing to recognize, but it could be brighter than what you can imagine.

Courtesy of h0p3. This is close to articulating the feeling I live in. I think I take issue with the ‘is’/‘could’ dichotomy. I am more like: it is ‘is’/‘is’.

I’m also tempted to make it more phonetic, but I think a phrase like this deserves to be pronounced Rid Tee Yawter—or to be butchered senselessly every time.

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Snackronyms

A compendium of pronounced shortenings and portmanteaus employed in this vicinity.

I very much dislike acronyms—you string together some letters and you’re done. They are certainly convenient when typing. They can confuse conversation. And usually the sound of them is stilted by the implied periods.

A snackronym is simply my term for a ‘word acronym’: a prounceable initialism of a term. These variations on a phrase are much more appealing to the author. (In a way, they recall the mood of cryptic crosswords, where skills and disciplines collide, not willy-nilly, but with blissful meaning and grammar punning.)

bipsbiff

Phonetic BPSBF. beautiful, pretty, smart, brave, fire.

corpypastas (or CorpASAs)

corporatey anthologies of self-advertising. (e.g. Instagram, Behance)

'cottoms up'

Phoneticalized ‘COTMs up’. COTM is crontab of the mind.

dwim

do what i mean.

heyfey

Phonetic HFEI. have fun, encourage, inspire.

nai-burrough

(Pronounced: ney-burro.) not an ideal burrough. (Or: nai-tribe.)

ridtyawtr

reality is darker than you are willing to recognize, but it could be brighter than what you can imagine.

Tim Toady

Phonetic refactoring of the acronym TMTOWDI. Or, there’s more than one way to do it.

tultywits

talk of and use the little things you want to survive.

Please reply with your own vital terms if you like. Thankyou for reading, as always.

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dwim

do what i mean.

do what i mean.

This could be seen strictly as an acronym, however I find the sound of ‘dwim’ as a word to convey exactly the sense of the fully expanded phrase. I usually use it in the context of a tool functioning well in the overall spirit I intend for it and may have to adapt for situations. I also feel like this term wards against uses that would be nice—but would move it outside its purview. But also: ‘I have been holding the kite like this, but feel free to dwim it much higher.’ (So: ‘the specific rules are not important if the wind changes.’)

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‘cottoms up’

Phoneticalized ‘COTMs up’. COTM is crontab of the mind.

Phoneticalized ‘COTMs up’. COTM is crontab of the mind.

Much like a jubilant toast, this expression ends an immensely thought-provoking discussion where I am left with much to reconsider. Like the ‘crontab’, a long-running system process that periodically triggers itself, these are the thoughts that might poke me on an hourly schedule throughout the night.

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bipsbiff

Phonetic BPSBF. beautiful, pretty, smart, brave, fire.

Phonetic BPSBF. beautiful, pretty, smart, brave, fire.

Kaylee said this everyday before she died. “I am beautiful, I am pretty, I am smart, I am brave, I am fire.” She was six-years-old and she knew to do this. Yes, beautiful and pretty is redundant. 😎 One of many wonderful things about this mantra.

This is usually not said but thought: “You are bipsbiff to me.” Or sometimes I say it to myself: “I am beautiful, I am pretty…” To bring ‘her’ into my mind. Sometimes I just say: “I am fire.” (She is fire.)

Also, if you’re wondering who Kaylee is—the strange thing is that I actually never knew her or met her, so I have no relation to her.

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Reply: Really Glad

Oh, I haven’t used it much—my two attempts so far have been a failure. But I love the concept of leaven. I’m determined to do better with it. Your podcast is a good reminder.

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08 Sep 2018

Reply: Parecki’s Canning

Rad color. I need to get cracking on this. My tomatoes are just starting to spill off the vines.

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24 Aug 2018

An ideal: privacy should increase as one goes further down the fame, class, race, power hierarchy. A public figure has traded privacy for these things, right?

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22 Aug 2018

Ticker Tape Parade

It’s good to be a little ‘river’ of thoughts—apart from the estuaries.

Inspired by the concept of Ripped Sheets of Paper, I began to see a new blog design in my mind that departed from all the current trends. (Related: Things We Left in the Old Web.)

The large majority of blogs and social media feeds out there are:

  • Highly rigid visually—a linear list of paragraphs.
  • Mostly blue and white (with a little gray.)
  • Bland. Often all posts are structured virtually the same, unless there are images.
  • Alike. There are common templates.

So, yeah, no wonder the Web has deteriorated! We just don’t care. It’s understandable—we experimented for a good ten or twenty years. I guess that’s why I wanted this site to border on bizarre—to try to reach for the other extreme without simply aspiring to brutalism.

To show that leaving social media can free you to build your own special place on the web. I have no reason to scream and war here in order to stand apart.

Exaggerated Importance

When I started laying out the main ‘river’ of strips on my various feed pages—here’s my August archive, for instance—I started to want the different posts to have a greater impact on the page based on what they were.

Screenshot of the new home page.

A tweet-style note thing should be tiny. It’s a mere thought.

A reply to someone might be longer, depending on the quality of the ideas within it.

And the long essays take a great length of time to craft—they should have the marquee.

It began to remind me of the aging ‘tag cloud’. Except that I couldn’t stand tag clouds because the small text in the cloud was always too small! And they also became stale—they always use the same layout. (It would be interesting to rethink the tag cloud—maybe with this ‘river’ in mind!)

It’s All There

Even though these ‘river’-style feeds are slender and light on metadata—for instance, the ‘river’ is very light on date and tagging info—it’s all there. All the metadata and post content is in the HTML. This is so that I can pop up the full post immediately. But also: that stuff is the microformats!

Why bother with microformats? I remember this technology coming out like a decade ago and—it went nowhere!

But, no, they are actually coming into stride. They allow me to syndicate and reply on micro.blog without leaving my site. I can reply to all my webfriends in like fashion. They have added a lot to blogging in these times—look up ‘Indieweb’.

Honestly, they make this blog worth using. For me. I feel like the design should be for you; the semantic structure is for me.

This lead to a happy coalescing of the design and the structure: I could load individual posts on a windowing layer over the home page. This is a kickback to the old DHTML windowing sites of yesteryear. (And, in part, inspired by the zine at whimsy.space.)


Screenshot of right-clicking on a post.

What’s more—nothing (except the archives dropdown, I should say) is broken if Javascript is off. You can still center-click on the square blog post cards to launch them in a tab. URLs in the browser should line up properly without filling your history with crap.

I do have some new kinds of post layouts that will be cropping up here are there—such as how this article is made of individual tiles. But it all flattens to simple HTML where I need it to.

One of the struggles of the modern Indieweb is to have uniqueness and flair without sacrificing function. I have to do a lot of customization to integrate with Twitter, micro.blog and RSS. But I hope you will not need to work around me. So that remains to be seen.

At any rate: thankyou! So many of you that I correspond with offered juicy conversations that stimulated this new design. My muse has always been Life Itself. The experiences and conversations all around --> inspiration! I feel fortunate to any eyes that wipe across my sentences from time to time.

Time to get back to linking to you.

  1. @cn oh yes of course! the sinkholes too

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21 Aug 2018

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17 Aug 2018

Turn of the Century Photograph of Charlie McAlister

“He never knew he was sick. And he died in the arms of a gal!”

It really sucks that Charlie McAlister died last year. I had really hoped to write to him more and maybe talk to him one day! Back in 1998, I found this cassette of his and it’s still out there! But you won’t find lyrics and tabs out there—he was truly underground. (There is a section of my upcoming link directory devoted to the muckpile of this rambling maniac.) In the meantime, please enjoy these wonderful lyrics to the second song.

Bog Man
He never knew he was sick
And he died in the arms of a gal!
Who threw his body into the bog
Next to the rice canal.
Next to the rice canal.
And ten-thousand years later they found
His body buried in the moss--
And his skin and eyes had turned to leather
And his bones had turned to rock.
His bones had turned to rock.
So then they took him to a museum
And put his body in a case.
And people came from miles around
To see the bog man's face.
To see the bog man's face.
But late one night after the museum had closed,
The bog man came back to life--
And he went out into the streets in a rage
And strangled the mayor's wife.
And strangled the mayor's wife.
So the next villager to die only had one leg
And couldn't run to escape.
And the bog man hit him with a cinder block
And a pointed rake.
And a pointed rake.
So the next villager to die was blind in one eye
And didn't see it coming.
And the bog man hit him with the pointed rake
Till the blood started flowing.
Bog man, bog man, you are an evil man.
Bog man, bog man, you are an evil man.
Bog man, bog man, you are an evil man.

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25 Jul 2018

Reply: Nights on Broadway

Kathleen Fitzpatrick

For the last week-plus, I’ve had The Bee Gees’ “Nights on Broadway” on repeat in my head.

Oh, yes, I had this happen. I was at a taco shack and the song came on. And I ate that taco very slow. I thought it was the full realization of the Bee Gees sound—which I hadn’t ever really ever appreciated before. I probably put in three months of that song.

Do they have other great ones?

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11 Jul 2018

A Bit of Personal Backstory #1

The Tapes

There is a RED CASSETTE TAPE and a WHITE CASSETTE TAPE.

As you may know, I am a former computer expert who has moved into alien studies and I am now dipping a toe—a very amateur toe—into genetic engineering. Specifically, I am working on a new (pricklier) type of squid. We in the field call this transgenic animaling.

It’s not as fun as it sounds. You’re basically just staring at a microwave for many, many hours.

But why move away from the promising field of computer studies? Especially now that multiple computers can be compressed into a single disk? The catalyst, for me, was the discovery of two cassette tapes that I will now introduce to you.


You see, there is a RED CASSETTE TAPE and a WHITE CASSETTE TAPE.

The RED CASSETTE TAPE is reported to contain instructions in an alien language. There are actually two officially recognized ways of listening to it.

The WHITE CASSETTE TAPE is a much longer record of information obtained by extraterrestrials, recorded in the voice of CHIEF MASTER SARGEANT TAMARA CARD of the 33rd Fighter Wing, Eglin Air Force Base, Florida. Her account was transcribed in a reference book entitled NINETY-FIVE WATERSHED ALIEN DEVELOPMENTS OF THE MODERN AGE BY DARRELL KNIGHT.

I knew Darrell during former times—we both happened to be gifted computer experts at the same time. The man was a veteran, I kept contact with him after his stroke and I spent many evenings visiting him in his room on the upper floor of the Dalesworth Veterans Administration Hospital. I never saw him use a television, but he continued to use a computer. He bought and sold rare fountain pens on eBay. In fact, this convinced me to resume using a computer for casual purposes to this day.

This WHITE CASSETTE TAPE is a human record of alien knowledge up to and including the year 2006. One of the predictions of the tape is that there will be a massive rift in human society as a result of alien knowledge becoming widely available. This rift was scheduled to occur in 2006 and I maintain that it DID IN FACT HAPPEN—however, not until the following year, in 2007. The RED CASSETTE TAPE should one day corroborate this.

I am not just talking about political or social upheavals. Or a mere rift down cultural lines. I am talking about an alteration in the fabric of human knowledge. I realize this sounds pretty vague and improbable—but try to have some respect for the years I’ve put into this—the way I describe it is: what if previously synonymous words realigned themselves with new words, but you were unaware of the change? I’m sorry, but that’s the best I can do with those words that are still somewhat functioning.


The WHITE AND RED CASSETTE TAPES contain another prediction which relates to the Revelations of Saint John, the final book of the Bible. This prediction states that the Revelations of Saint John are incorrect in some predictions, specifically with regard to the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse. The count is wrong; the correct number of horsemen is two. Darrell—again, Darrell the veteran and former computer expert—both of us could run circles around EVERYONE when it came time to interface with faxmodems—Darrell verified to me that the correct number is two. But he also emphasized that these Revelations are constructs of a collapsed reality and that there are no horsemen any longer, for they are lost in another failed reality.

I liked the idea of four horsemen. For some reasons, I liked two even better. So I’m reluctant to go with the idea of none. I’d like to hear it from THE RED CASSETTE TAPE before I back out.

I have said that there are two ways of listening to the red cassette tape. The first is to play it on a standard tape recorder and it can be understood if you are versed in alien tongues. To me it sounds like nothing. I am unable to hear it myself yet. THIS IS WHY I SAY “REPORTED TO CONTAIN ALIEN LANGUAGE” BECAUSE I CANNOT TELL FOR MYSELF. But Darrell could hear it, along with Patty Schlater—a woman who works in the kitchen stiff at the VA hospital—she can sometimes hear it, but not translate it.

The second way of listening to it is by placing it in a holographic video unit. Sgt. Tamara Card describes the curious workings of one of these units. She places its location at a multimedia library inside the testing facility at Groom Lake. Since the cassette tape is damaged, it is not known how much holographic video information is stored on the tape, but it is alleged to contain very important footage of world events. It shows the crucifixion of Christ: MEANING IT SHOWS THE CRUCIFIXION OF CHRIST IN HOLOGRAPHIC 3-D. It is possible that there are individuals out there who have come across holographic video units and this is why I am beginning with a discussion of the red cassette tape. If you are in possession of one of these units, I urge you to contact me.

Now, it is tiring to tell this story. If you are reading, then you certainly don’t believe me and you likely won’t even attempt to be my friend. That’s okay—I believe it’s definitely up to me to make the initial move to be your friend. But I am having a difficult time doing that because two months ago I went to the VA hospital in the evening and was told to speak to Evonne, the woman who acts as the Executive Director of the hospital and who has the authority to take visitors on guided tours of the facility.

Because of the urgency of the request, I visited Evonne immediately and I was told by her that Darrell Knight had passed away at 6:25 AM that morning.

So, you see, my purpose in writing this is to try to preserve him in my backstory.

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07 Jul 2018

‘Simon replied: "I don’t make a habit of displaying my reverence for a great many things. I tend to keep matters like this to myself, for I believe: What’s the point of wearing a serious expression if one’s been earmarked by fate—’ — p99, The Tanners by Robert Walser

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30 Jun 2018

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01 May 2018

Tridactyl Trycts

Some nice key combos for the combo-driven Firefox extension.

Having long been a fan of web-browsing with a keyboard—by way of the old Vimperator extension for Firefox—I have enjoyed its rebirth in the present incarnation of the Tridactyl extension.

As I’ve been adapting to the subtle differences, I’ve found myself browsing the complete list of key combos lately—trying to impress the useful combos into muscle memory. I’m going to jot some favorites here for future reference.

Quick Cookie Clean

I know this is going to seem sketchy, like I’m hiding something, but I often find myself needing to clean cookies for a web site while I’m working on it.

:sanitize cookies -t 1h

This cleans all cookies set in the last hour. Wish I could narrow it to a specific domain name match.

Adding your own helpful signout command might look like:

:command signout sanitize cookies localStorage -t 1h

Copy and Search

Never had this ability before: a combo to copy an HTML element’s text to the clipboard and then “put” it into the current tab—which will usually pass the text into your search engine. (If it’s a URL, though, it will just go there.)

;pP

The ;p allows you to yank the contents of a page element by name. And the P puts (or pipes) the clipboard contents into a “tabopen” command.

(I think of this move as the “double raspberry”—it’s the emoticon upon one’s face when landing such a maneuver.)

Pagination on Old School Forums

It just so happens that the [[ and ]] keybindings work great on BGG geeklists and Yucata.de forums. This is so much more convenient than follow on those tiny fonts they often use.

Simpler Tab Switching

I’ve bound the shifted J and K to tabprev and tabnext—hitting gtgtgtgt over and over again was a bit too much of an exercise. Perhaps I would use that hotkey more if it was possible to hold down g and hit t or T in repetition to cycle.

:bind J tabprev
:bind K tabnext

In my mind, this works well with H and L to navigate history.

(Incidentally, to pop a tab out into a new window, use the :tabdetach command. I tend to use this frequently enough that it should probably be bound—just not sure where!)

Quickmarks

This isn’t documented very well, but if you want to bookmark a site, you can supply it’s URL to the bmark comand:

:bmark https://www.kickscondor.com/

These are not kept in the same list as your Firefox bookmarks—this is a flat list rather than a hierarchy.

There are some keys bound to some bookmark calls. Allow me to clear them up:

  • A bookmarks (or unbookmarks) the current URL.
  • a does the same, but allows the URL to be edited first.
  • M<key> gives the bookmark (at the current URL) a single character alias. To use this, you must be on the bookmarked page.
  • To use the alias, prefix it with go, gn or gw—these expand to open, tabopen and windowopen. (So: gwp will open a new window with the URL aliased as “p”.)

These three commands are created when you run the M command. So, to remove these commands, you’ll need to do individually: :reset gnp and so on.

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F.A.T. Lab is Dead

Geez I was really hoping the ending would reveal that they were all dead the whole time. Now we’re going to need to band together, in order to resist this intoxicating urge to deify F.A.T.

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The World’s First World Record

Incredible debut LP in the tradition of the Slits, Love is All, The New Sound of Numbers and certain songs from Bis’ New Transistor Heroes. Never has there been a greater riff on “Pease Porridge Hot.”

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The World of JSON Exposed

An incredibly thorough review of JSON specifications and parsers. Fantastic criticism of the RFC, but beyond that: the benchmarking and concise bug hunting here is something every parser project should count themselves lucky to have.

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09 Mar 2018

Fables of Tables #1

Rising Sun: The Shame and Sorrows of Godzilla

In my first game of Rising Sun, a Kaiju came in from the sea—and what happened next brought a profound mix of delight and sadness.

This is the first in my Fables of Tables series. It’s a type of review series. But instead of dryly reviewing the game’s mechanics and stamping some harsh grade on its face, I’m just going to tell a story.

Today’s game is Rising Sun. This is a miniatures game—full of plastic monsters. I don’t really play miniatures games, but a friend had a copy so it just happened. And, what the blazes? A miniatures game in pastels?

Midway through the game, I noticed that you could buy a giant Godzilla-like monster to have in your crew.

Daikaiju, so not exactly Godzilla, but hey.

“What’s the Godzilla do?” I asked.

And the friend who owns the game—I’ll call him Hustle—says, “Oh, he has five force.” So he’s huge—his power is equal to five whole army guys.

He goes on to explain that when you buy the Kaiju, you put him out in the sea—the whole board is a rough map of Japan and there is water surrounding the islands—so you put the monster out there, and then during battle you can spring him on to any of the game’s provinces and he’ll destroy all the buildings there. (The buildings are these strongholds where your units can appear.)

“Oh man!” I’m thinking. “Just like Godzilla! I love it! I gotta have it!”

I just really enjoy monster movies—particularly Shin Godzilla—that wail that sounds like metal sheets tearing and that slow, sinuous tail as he moves methodically through the cityscape. I get that he’s historically out of place in this game, but I don’t care! He is the force of the Earth fighting back against civilization—what if he could have done this in some bygone age?

The guy playing purple (don’t recall his name) buys the Kaiju before I can. This player is already in the lead and now has Godzilla, placing him in the sea. It is as if two titans of this world have allied and we are waiting for our defeat.

I look on wistfully at this being. Five force! I am in awe and I sit in anticipation of what the lurking god will do when war begins.


War arrives and the fellow playing purple brings Godzilla on to land in the northern province of Hokkaido. The Kaiju storms into the scene and—well, there are no buildings there—he has no effect. But still—this is an island teaming with monsters and warriors and look how Godzilla towers above them!!

Hustle reaches across the giant board and points. “Ok, so, you see, I have the Earth Dragon here.”

Hot snakes, I had forgotten about the Earth Dragon! So the Earth Dragon does not have the force that Godzilla has. However, the Earth Dragon is able to push away one unit from each opponent in the battle. It is as if the Earth Dragon takes a big breath and then >SNUFF< a bunch of guys fly off to other parts of the island.

Of course, he chooses to snuff off Godzilla. The Earth Dragon takes a big breath and a myriad of warriors and creatures scatter across the map. Godzilla is propelled all the way across the board—using a marked sea lane, I should add, since the winds of the dragons respect these rules as well—and he lands in Kyushu, destroying a few buildings when he lands.

War rages on and, before long, the spotlight shines on Kyushu. Godzilla has picked up the pieces and, with some tarnished pride, admirably overshadows the vast assembly of demons and gods there.

“Hang on,” says the player to my right, “my Fire Dragon goes first.”

Holy cats! Right! The Fire Dragon! This twisty, devious dragon coughs his terrible fireballs just as the battle forms—incinerating one unit for each opponent present in the conflict. Warriors and barbaric creatures fall away in the fire—and Godzilla himself, no, it can’t be! Can it??

Gods, it is true! The vast unshakable behemoth is now wildly dashing from the island in a pyre of his own burning scales. He tumbles down the beach, a maniacally flailing lizard, a lizard of flame and agony, howling his metal-rending chord.

The great Kaiju sinks back into the ocean—in shame and sorrow—having made no effect on the actual game at all. Like we never did any math with Godzilla involved. Literally no effect.


I sat there for some time after the game had concluded. Stunned and humbled. I contemplated the fate of Godzilla. Perhaps even the great gods get tossed and squashed and embarassed on a bad day.

Perhaps when I die, my Guardian—or my Saint or Kami—will approach me to greet me into a new kingdom. And she, too, may trip and fall into fire, to be engulfed and never seen again. These things happen. I realize that now.

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26 Oct 2017

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25 Oct 2017

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24 Jan 2017

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30 Jan 2016

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12 Jan 2016

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